Skip site navigation (1)Skip section navigation (2)
Date:      Sat, 07 Jul 2007 15:10:45 -0500
From:      Derek Ragona <derek@computinginnovations.com>
To:        "Lisa Casey" <lisa@jellico.com>, <freebsd-questions@freebsd.org>
Subject:   Re: Adding a new command
Message-ID:  <6.0.0.22.2.20070707150546.02535328@mail.computinginnovations.com>
In-Reply-To: <003b01c7c0b4$e01a3a50$d5b9bfcf@lisac>
References:  <003b01c7c0b4$e01a3a50$d5b9bfcf@lisac>

Next in thread | Previous in thread | Raw E-Mail | Index | Archive | Help
At 11:35 AM 7/7/2007, Lisa Casey wrote:
>Hi,
>
>Once I get this new system going I promise I'll quit pestering you folks :-)
>
>Got another question. This should be simple to answer. I've done this 
>before but can't seem to replicate it this morning. I have a few scripts 
>my employees use to do things such as add a new radius user, restart the 
>radius server and tail the radius log file. The most simple one is 
>radlog.  The file radlog contains the line:
>tail -f  /var/log/radius.log
>
>I need to be able to type radlog from anywhere on the system and have it work.
>
>I put the file radlog in /bin   (/bin and  /sbin are all in my shell's 
>path). Ownership is root/wheel  permissions are 555 (I've tried 700 and 
>777 - these don't need write access though). But when I type radlog I get 
>command not found. I can type ./bin/radlog and it works but I don't want 
>that. I thought if the file was in my path and if it was executable just 
>typing the name of the file from anywhere would work but evidently I'm 
>overlooking something. What?
>
>Thanks,
>
>Lisa Casey

Try testing with a new login session.  It is likely your shell is caching 
the commands in your paths.

You can easily test after logging in and try the which command:
which radlog

On the permissions, you would do well to setup a special group to execute 
the commands making it easier for users to execute them without being 
root.  If your new utilities are working with log files be sure the log 
files are readable by this group as well.

As previously mentioned added user commands are customarily placed in 
/usr/local/bin doing so will aid any new sysadmin looking for them.


         -Derek

-- 
This message has been scanned for viruses and
dangerous content by MailScanner, and is
believed to be clean.
MailScanner thanks transtec Computers for their support.




Want to link to this message? Use this URL: <http://docs.FreeBSD.org/cgi/mid.cgi?6.0.0.22.2.20070707150546.02535328>