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Date:      Tue, 5 May 2020 00:12:15 -0500
From:      Quantafac <quantafac@ubiquitous.ninja>
To:        Brandon helsley <brandon.helsley@hotmail.com>, "freebsd-questions@freebsd.org" <freebsd-questions@freebsd.org>
Subject:   Re: Networking Routing Firewalling
Message-ID:  <1d54d723-493c-4dd5-6866-e0146829ecdc@ubiquitous.ninja>
In-Reply-To: <CY4PR19MB16558D8B8076AEB6710DFC90F9A70@CY4PR19MB1655.namprd19.prod.outlook.com>
References:  <CY4PR19MB16558D8B8076AEB6710DFC90F9A70@CY4PR19MB1655.namprd19.prod.outlook.com>

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Brandon,

Yes there are networking tasks that you can learn with a single interface.
* You can setup virtual networks using jails using manual addressing to
play with different configurations to better understand what each
setting does. Try to ping your different jails to see if you set it up
properly and it acts as you expect.
* Sub-netting
* Routing
* Telnet
* SSH

ping is used to verify that basic network connectivity exists with your
target. It essentially verifies that there is a path to get there and
how long it took. It is usually the first tool in troubleshooting a
network connection. Can it ping? Are you losing any pings? Are the ping
times high?

traceroute shows you the route ping takes to get to it's target. If you
lose connection to a device you want to make sure the path to get to it
is good and hopefully find where it is getting dropped so you know where
to start looking.

route is used to modify the network path (route) that is taken to reach
any particular network (most often the internet) or target system.

netstat -r will show you your systems current routing table configuration.

Not sure what you mean on your last question. DNS is not an IP but is a
service that holds records that point to IPs or other names/aliases. You
can have an IPv4 and an IPv6 address active on the same interface. You
can actually have multiple IPs of either type setup on a single
interface if you want. I would recommend you understand the basics of
networking first. IPs, subnets, gateways, routes and what they do.

This is an in depth guide on TCP/IP it will tell you more than you might
ever want to know about the protocols.
http://tcpipguide.com/free/index.htm

An entertaining intro to IPv6 networking
https://www.networkingwithfish.com/understanding-ipv6-the-journey-begins/

I like Eli the Computer Guy on Youtube. He has a pretty good intro to
networking here. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rL8RSFQG8do&t=1369s

---
Thanks,
Steven


On 5/4/20 8:39 PM, Brandon helsley wrote:
> I don't always get a response but while I'm getting a little more familiar with networking and jails, especially from absolute freebsd and these mailing lists I thought I would ask a few questions.
> 
> First of all, what are some beginner networking tasks I could complete while getting familiar?
> 
> Second, if I'm only using one network interface card at a time, are there still networking tasks I can complete and build a stronger connection to the internet with?
> 
> Third, if learning to use ping and route but don't quite undserstand it's application yet. If I set up dns and dhcp can I set up a third ip that's ipv6 for the hell of it?
> 
> Sent from Outlook Mobile<https://aka.ms/blhgte>;
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