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Date:      Tue, 10 Sep 96 08:47:07 -0500
From:      Ben Black <black@gage.com>
To:        Nadav Eiron <nadav@barcode.co.il>
Cc:        Rob Buchanan <rob@www.odod.ohio.gov>, questions@freebsd.org
Subject:   Re: Multi host web server on FreeBSD
Message-ID:  <9609101346.AA14425@squid.gage.com>
In-Reply-To: <Pine.BSF.3.91.960909204500.4905A-100000@gatekeeper.barcode.co.il>
References:  <Pine.BSF.3.91.960909204500.4905A-100000@gatekeeper.barcode.co.il>

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> Well, the reason is that the rule to go by is that if a machine has more
> than one IP address those should be on different networks. Since when

no, the rule is if you have a machine with more than one INTERFACE they need  
to be on different networks.

> configuring virtual hosts you normally won't assign addresses from
> different nets or subnets, using a mask of all 1-s will let you use
> addresses from the same net.

if you have a netmask of 255.255.255.0 and you add an alias within the same  
network to a given interface along with a route for that IP through localhost  
you get the saem thing, except without using weird netmasks.  you just use  
the same netmask as the primary IP on the interface.

the reason i asked why you were doing it that way is because it seemed  
rather redundant and confusing for newbies.  skipping the netmask magic has  
no effect on functionality, but it does improve understandability (if i may  
be permitted to butcher the english language).


b3n
black@cypher.net

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<smaller>> Well, the reason is that the rule to go by is that if a machine
has more 

> than one IP address those should be on different networks. Since when 


no, the rule is if you have a machine with more than one INTERFACE they
need to be on different networks.  

<nofill>
> configuring virtual hosts you normally won't assign addresses from 
> different nets or subnets, using a mask of all 1-s will let you use 
> addresses from the same net.
</nofill>

</smaller>if you have a netmask of 255.255.255.0 and you add an alias
within the same network to a given interface along with a route for that
IP through localhost you get the saem thing, except without using weird
netmasks.  you just use the same netmask as the primary IP on the
interface.


the reason i asked why you were doing it that way is because it seemed
rather redundant and confusing for newbies.  skipping the netmask magic
has no effect on functionality, but it does improve understandability (if
i may be permitted to butcher the english language).


<nofill>
b3n
black@cypher.net
</nofill>
--NeXT-Mail-827975070-2--



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