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Date:      Tue, 5 May 2020 12:17:54 +0200
From:      Johan Hendriks <joh.hendriks@gmail.com>
To:        freebsd-questions@freebsd.org
Subject:   Re: Networking Routing Firewalling
Message-ID:  <b2e05d11-5c0d-08c8-c063-737a4d87c895@gmail.com>
In-Reply-To: <CY4PR19MB16558D8B8076AEB6710DFC90F9A70@CY4PR19MB1655.namprd19.prod.outlook.com>
References:  <CY4PR19MB16558D8B8076AEB6710DFC90F9A70@CY4PR19MB1655.namprd19.prod.outlook.com>

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Op 05-05-2020 om 03:39 schreef Brandon helsley:
> I don't always get a response but while I'm getting a little more familiar with networking and jails, especially from absolute freebsd and these mailing lists I thought I would ask a few questions.
>
> First of all, what are some beginner networking tasks I could complete while getting familiar?
>
> Second, if I'm only using one network interface card at a time, are there still networking tasks I can complete and build a stronger connection to the internet with?
>
> Third, if learning to use ping and route but don't quite undserstand it's application yet. If I set up dns and dhcp can I set up a third ip that's ipv6 for the hell of it?
>
> Sent from Outlook Mobile<https://aka.ms/blhgte>;
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Getting into networking is something you learn by doing it and doing it 
a lot.
Beginner networking tasks are setting up a network between two or more 
machines all in the same network like 192.168.0.0/24.
Then try to put them in there own network and use route to let them talk 
to eachother. like one machine in 192.168.0.0/24 and the second machine 
in 192.168.1.0/24 and so on.

Then you can try to get things working using smaller network segments 
like 192.168.0.1/29 and a network of 192.168.0.8 /29 and so on and make 
sure they do not overlap and let them communicate, test with ping.

The second question is somewhat unclear to me.
Do you have multiple Nics in your machine? If so, you can use the second 
NIC for testing.


The third question, ping is just a basic tool you can use to test basic 
network functionality.
route is a tool to make sure that your network knows where to go if it 
needs to go to an address not in your own network.

DNS is not so much networking, it just resolves names to IP addresses. 
DHCP you can use to give hosts an IP address instead of giving them a 
static one.

You can give an NIC or any interface like a bridge or a epair an ipv6 
address.

Here is an nice article about networking

https://issue.freebsdfoundation.org/publication/?m=33057&i=651491&p=19&ver=html5

Good luck.





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