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Date:      Wed, 22 May 2013 08:39:39 +0400
From:      Dmitry Sivachenko <trtrmitya@gmail.com>
To:        Charles Swiger <cswiger@mac.com>
Cc:        questions@freebsd.org
Subject:   Re: RES column in top(1) output
Message-ID:  <C9B2E9C2-EE5A-47BA-ADE2-64E39B5731D3@gmail.com>
In-Reply-To: <B12E243B-4D87-4EC5-950D-B78C82B9BE45@mac.com>
References:  <24044FD7-4E2A-493F-B0CE-701C3A73169F@gmail.com> <B12E243B-4D87-4EC5-950D-B78C82B9BE45@mac.com>

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On 21.05.2013, at 22:40, Charles Swiger <cswiger@mac.com> wrote:
>>=20
>> Mem: 55G Active, 23G Inact, 11G Wired, 3729M Cache, 9838M Buf, 97M =
Free
>> Swap: 49G Total, 14M Used, 49G Free
>>=20
>>=20
>> PID USERNAME      THR PRI NICE   SIZE    RES STATE   C   TIME   WCPU =
COMMAND
>> 93273 username        103  52    0   141G   115G uwait  22  25:37 =
19.82% XXX
>>=20
>> So I have a machine with 96GB of RAM, no swap is used and my =
process's resident size is 115G (more than physical memory).
>=20
> Memory that has been allocated but not written to is associated with =
the process address space in terms of accounting, but does not actually =
consume physical memory.  There's also copy-on-write memory (used for =
the program executable code itself, which is also typically also marked =
read-only), mmap()ing big sparse files or device special files like a =
video framebuffer (ie, an X11 server), and probably a few other things =
which can reserve lots of resident memory without actually consuming =
physical memory.
>=20


Okay, I see.

What is the correct way to obtain the amount of physical memory used by =
a process?

Thanks!=



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