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Date:      Thu, 16 Oct 2014 02:25:49 +0200
From:      Polytropon <freebsd@edvax.de>
To:        "William A. Mahaffey III" <wam@hiwaay.net>
Cc:        FreeBSD Questions !!!! <freebsd-questions@freebsd.org>
Subject:   Re: Noob question ....
Message-ID:  <20141016022549.e9052163.freebsd@edvax.de>
In-Reply-To: <543F105A.1090704@hiwaay.net>
References:  <543F041D.7030206@hiwaay.net> <20141016013646.34d542e6.freebsd@edvax.de> <543F0863.60205@hiwaay.net> <20141016020025.27547cc0.freebsd@edvax.de> <543F105A.1090704@hiwaay.net>

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On Wed, 15 Oct 2014 19:24:58 -0500, William A. Mahaffey III wrote:
> On 10/15/14 19:00, Polytropon wrote:
> 
> <snip>
> 
> > There isn't much work to do: freebsd-update does it out of the box. 
> > Just keep in mind that you can only use it to track -RELEASE, either 
> > follow the -RELEASE branch and add security updates, or increase the 
> > -RELEASE version number. Dealing with a custom kernel is also 
> > possible, but as few "custom additions" you have, the happier 
> > freebsd-update will be. :-) 
> > https://www.freebsd.org/doc/handbook/updating-upgrading-freebsdupdate.html 
> > See 24.2.3. for details about program invocation. 
> 
> *Booooyah* !!!! That web page mentions keeping a GENERIC kernel in 
> /boot/GENERIC. I have *NO* plans to start using custom kernels, but if I 
> cracked up & decided to, what exactly needs to be copied into 
> /boot/GENERIC ? Just checking

It's not a bad idea to have such a kernel in place, just
for the case that you can't currently imagine. When such
a case happens, you can "boot GENERIC" and have a kernel
that reliably works (because that's what GENERIC has been
designed for). It doesn't take much space to do so, and
it does not interfere with the rest of the system.

You simply copy the whole /boot/kernel/* directory content
to /boot/GENERIC/, which contains the kernel modules as well
as the kernel itself. I think in case of the -RELEASE set,
the *.symbol files will also be included.

	# cd /boot
	# cp -r kernel GENERIC

The "make installkernel" procedure creates a backup of the
previous kernel (which _could_ be the GENERIC kernel, but
doesn't have to be). By providing your own GENERIC backup,
you'll be safe in case of a failed kernel update.


-- 
Polytropon
Magdeburg, Germany
Happy FreeBSD user since 4.0
Andra moi ennepe, Mousa, ...



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