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Date:      Wed, 15 Oct 2014 19:34:51 -0500
From:      "William A. Mahaffey III" <wam@hiwaay.net>
Cc:        "FreeBSD Questions !!!!" <freebsd-questions@freebsd.org>
Subject:   Re: Noob question ....
Message-ID:  <543F12AB.6070606@hiwaay.net>
In-Reply-To: <20141016022549.e9052163.freebsd@edvax.de>
References:  <543F041D.7030206@hiwaay.net> <20141016013646.34d542e6.freebsd@edvax.de> <543F0863.60205@hiwaay.net> <20141016020025.27547cc0.freebsd@edvax.de> <543F105A.1090704@hiwaay.net> <20141016022549.e9052163.freebsd@edvax.de>

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On 10/15/14 19:25, Polytropon wrote:
> On Wed, 15 Oct 2014 19:24:58 -0500, William A. Mahaffey III wrote:
>> On 10/15/14 19:00, Polytropon wrote:
>>
>> <snip>
>>
>>> There isn't much work to do: freebsd-update does it out of the box.
>>> Just keep in mind that you can only use it to track -RELEASE, either
>>> follow the -RELEASE branch and add security updates, or increase the
>>> -RELEASE version number. Dealing with a custom kernel is also
>>> possible, but as few "custom additions" you have, the happier
>>> freebsd-update will be. :-)
>>> https://www.freebsd.org/doc/handbook/updating-upgrading-freebsdupdate.html
>>> See 24.2.3. for details about program invocation.
>> *Booooyah* !!!! That web page mentions keeping a GENERIC kernel in
>> /boot/GENERIC. I have *NO* plans to start using custom kernels, but if I
>> cracked up & decided to, what exactly needs to be copied into
>> /boot/GENERIC ? Just checking
> It's not a bad idea to have such a kernel in place, just
> for the case that you can't currently imagine. When such
> a case happens, you can "boot GENERIC" and have a kernel
> that reliably works (because that's what GENERIC has been
> designed for). It doesn't take much space to do so, and
> it does not interfere with the rest of the system.
>
> You simply copy the whole /boot/kernel/* directory content
> to /boot/GENERIC/, which contains the kernel modules as well
> as the kernel itself. I think in case of the -RELEASE set,
> the *.symbol files will also be included.
>
> 	# cd /boot
> 	# cp -r kernel GENERIC
>
> The "make installkernel" procedure creates a backup of the
> previous kernel (which _could_ be the GENERIC kernel, but
> doesn't have to be). By providing your own GENERIC backup,
> you'll be safe in case of a failed kernel update.

Excellent, thx.

-- 

	William A. Mahaffey III

  ----------------------------------------------------------------------

	"The M1 Garand is without doubt the finest implement of war
	 ever devised by man."
                            -- Gen. George S. Patton Jr.




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