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Date:      Mon, 27 Nov 2017 12:28:32 -0600 (CST)
From:      "Valeri Galtsev" <galtsev@kicp.uchicago.edu>
To:        "Steve O'Hara-Smith" <steve@sohara.org>
Cc:        freebsd-questions@freebsd.org
Subject:   Re: Questions About
Message-ID:  <25393.128.135.52.6.1511807312.squirrel@cosmo.uchicago.edu>
In-Reply-To: <20171127170322.7aaca527bebc2ec32ec95c58@sohara.org>
References:  <CAH6qqSmDB=j9g5bKQwtL6yJM=n8q8ddmbduOeFb58tZC45pdnQ@mail.gmail.com> <20171127170322.7aaca527bebc2ec32ec95c58@sohara.org>

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On Mon, November 27, 2017 11:03 am, Steve O'Hara-Smith wrote:
> On Mon, 27 Nov 2017 22:04:16 +0530
> Rahul raj <rahulrny03@gmail.com> wrote:
>
>> How Different Bsd operating system from Linux ?
>
> 	That's a very big question.

Small question, but calling for big answer ;-) I certainly am not as
knowledgeable as Steve O'Hara-Smith is. I just would add Linux refugee
prospective.

Over 5 years ago I started seriously looking which system to migrate Linux
servers to. The reason (one of them) was: on average you have to reboot
Linux every 45 days. There is either kernel update or glibc update, so you
have to reboot. Compared to that FreeBSD only has updates requiring reboot
about once a year. Recently there were other big turns Linux took which
very many who use Linux dislike a lot (systemd, firewalld, and friends).
This can be considered question of taste, but for me that just confirmed I
was right when decided to flee servers to FreeBSD. My favorite CentOS
Linux (aka binary replica of RedHat Enterprise) became more like MS
Windows, and farther away from UNIX IMHO.

Good luck making right choice. You can install two systems on the same
machine, and start using both, then you will make your own choice based on
your own experience. If it is server I would strongly recommend FreeBSD
(or any of close relatives like NetBSD). If it is workstation, it may be
simpler to install FreeBSD based TrueOS (formerly known as PC_BSD). I,
however, preferred a bit more works and have FreeBSD on my workstation and
on my PC laptop.

Steve mentioned FreeBSD handbook. I would say, FreeBSD is the best
documented system IMO.

Just my $0.02

Valeri

> There are philosophical differences,
> licensing differences, design differences, packaging differences and code
> differences, any one of which could fill a book sized discussion (and may
> well do in the near future).
>
> 	There are also big similarities that stem from them both being
> largely POSIX/SUS compliant and having mostly the same software available.
>
> 	If you are used to linux and can read the handbook then you should
> have no real trouble trying FreeBSD and then you can get to know the
> differences in the most important way - they way they affect *you*.
>
> --
> Steve O'Hara-Smith <steve@sohara.org>
> _______________________________________________
> freebsd-questions@freebsd.org mailing list
> https://lists.freebsd.org/mailman/listinfo/freebsd-questions
> To unsubscribe, send any mail to
> "freebsd-questions-unsubscribe@freebsd.org"
>


++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Valeri Galtsev
Sr System Administrator
Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics
Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics
University of Chicago
Phone: 773-702-4247
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++



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