Skip site navigation (1)Skip section navigation (2)
Date:      Thu, 16 Oct 2014 14:20:16 -0400
From:      Lowell Gilbert <freebsd-questions-local@be-well.ilk.org>
To:        Walter <fbsd@saveouraquifer.org>
Cc:        freebsd-questions@freebsd.org
Subject:   Re: minder
Message-ID:  <4461fjvpun.fsf@be-well.ilk.org>
In-Reply-To: <543ED1D6.3000500@saveouraquifer.org> (Walter's message of "Wed,  15 Oct 2014 15:58:14 -0400")
References:  <543ED1D6.3000500@saveouraquifer.org>

Next in thread | Previous in thread | Raw E-Mail | Index | Archive | Help
Walter <fbsd@saveouraquifer.org> writes:

> I'm wanting to have (or write) a utility to keep a list of IP addresses
> of various computers so I can connect to them over the internet.
> I found 'minder' in the ports which seems to say that's what it does,
> but I can't find documentation on how to use it; the website:
> http://www.alhem.net/project/minder/ is not helpful.  Anyone?

That's essentially a library for keeping track of peers, but the only
application example seems to be a trivial test client. It might be able
to locate peers as well, but I haven't run across that functionality so
it may not exist.

It may be a useful tool in building a useful system, but it's a fairly
small piece.

> On the other hand, if I write my own I can then expand it to do
> other p2p things, like synchronize file directories, chat, messages,
> remote program activation, et cetera.  I looked a bit at:
>
> bitmessage - current
> retroshare - current
> kenosis - not current (last news: 2005)
> Kademlia - various
> dox - unknown
> opendchub - current
> microdc2 -    ^^^^^
>
> but it's hard to know how useful these are without trying them all,
> and I'm hoping people here can guide me.

Unlikely. Personal preferences are going to be a major factor. 

>                                           Ultimately, I'm interested
> in secure, encrypted p2p operations starting with basic messaging,
> which will run on Windows-something, Mac, and Linux (BSD) OS's.

Try not to develop homegrown encryption or encrypted protocols. Unlike
other kinds of programming, you can't establish its correctness by
testing. 

Mac, Linux, and BSD are all distinct. But they're all POSIX-compliant,
which is probably good enough for using the same code for the core
functionality, and there are toolkits that can make a lot of GUI work
reusable. Windows is more difficult as far as compatibility, but not
impossible. Still, you're talking about a very big project.



Want to link to this message? Use this URL: <http://docs.FreeBSD.org/cgi/mid.cgi?4461fjvpun.fsf>