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Date:      Thu, 03 Oct 1996 14:47:33 -0400
From:      Chris Shenton <cshenton@it.hq.nasa.gov>
To:        questions@freefall.freebsd.org
Subject:   Re: 2.2 -- COMPAQ / PCI
Message-ID:  <199610031847.SAA19657@wirehead.it.hq.nasa.gov>
In-Reply-To: Your message of "Wed, 2 Oct 1996 12:31:07 -0700 (PDT)"
References:  <199610021931.MAA00443@freefall.freebsd.org>

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Matt Rosenberg <matt@server.wulaw.wustl.edu> said:

    More problems with COMPAQ and the PCI bus.  I tried installing the latest
    version (2.2-960801SNAP) to try and solve the problem, but on the probe of
    the PCI bus on my COMPAQ ProLiant 5000 it fails to find any of the PCI
    devices other than the chipset and also shows the wrong amount of memory.
    ...
    and then it goes on to the ISA devices.  My current FreeBSD system is in
    desparate need of upgrade, and I don't want to have to migrate to another
    flavor of UNIX.  Hints?  Suggestions?

I set up an ISP recently and they had a couple Compaqs they wanted to
use; can't remember the model, but the series with everything on the
motherboard. Several folks warned me about trying to get Compaq's
integrated hardware to work -- no docs, proprietary, all interrupts
used, etc.

Well, we finally were able to get both of 'em to work, but had to put
in our own Adaptec SCSI controller, and ether card, and disable their
internal ones. For this, we had to boot off the special Compaq CDROM
and tweak things. Then we got hosed because there's some DIP-switch on
the motherboard that has to be in one position to allow the CDROM to
tell the system config to change, and another to tell it to not allow
any more changes. What a hassle. Oh, and we could only get their
graphics chip to run X11 at 640x480 cuz it has a paltry 256K or 512K
RAM on it... cheap.

But after installation (FreeBSD-2.1.5-RELEASE) I did a
/usr/X11R6/bin/scanpci and -- wonder of wonders -- it told me there
was a Lance Ethernet and NCR SCSI controller in there. These were the
built-in devices. If I had known that, I probably could have used them
instead of all the nonsense reconfiguring the system to handle my own
hardware. I would have tried this but ran out of time on the project :-(

I hope this helps. We wasted 32 hours trying to get the first one to
run FreeBSD. :-( Never had any where near these problems on generic
hardware. 

PS: We also had a problem with it not finding the right amount of
    memory (sometimes seeing 48M instead of 64M, or seeing a *huge* amount
    instead of 64M). I'm sorry but I can't remember what we did to fix
    this, but it might have had to do with the tweak CDROM thing to tell
    it how much was really installed. Sorry.





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