Skip site navigation (1)Skip section navigation (2)
Date:      Fri, 9 Feb 1996 09:19:13 -0700
From:      kelly@fsl.noaa.gov (Sean Kelly)
To:        pglasson@albury.net.au
Cc:        questions@freebsd.org
Subject:   Re: FreeBSD 2.0.5 "Root Login Not Allowed Here" after kernel build
Message-ID:  <9602091619.AA20987@emu.fsl.noaa.gov>
In-Reply-To: <199602091208.XAA28200@orac.albury.net.au> (message from Phill Glasson on Fri, 09 Feb 96 21:22:22 -0800)

Next in thread | Previous in thread | Raw E-Mail | Index | Archive | Help
>>>>> "Phill" == Phill Glasson <pglasson@albury.net.au> writes:

    Phill> Hi, I've just compiled a new kernel for my system (third
    Phill> time!) and when I select the new kernel from the boot
    Phill> prompt, I fail to login as root.

Log in with your own user account (*).  Then use the `su' command to
become root.  You should never actually log in as root ... it's harder
to track security breaches that way.  With the `su' command, you at
least have a record (sometimes) of who became root and when.

Once you're logged in with your own user account, you can enable root
logins by editing the file /etc/ttys:

                                                    VVVVVV
console none                            unknown off secure
ttyv0   "/usr/libexec/getty Pc"         cons25  on  secure
                                                    ^^^^^^              

By using `secure,' you specify that root can log in directly on the
listed port.  If you use `insecure,' then root cannot log in (you can
still su in either case).

After editing /etc/ttys, type

	kill -1 1

to force init to reread the file and see the updates.



Footnotes:

(*) What, you didn't make an account for yourself?  You just use root
all the time?  What are you, some kind of DOS user?!?  :-)

Okay, do this: at the `boot:' prompt, type

	-s

to boot into single user mode.  You'll be prompted for the root
password.  Type it.  Then choose a shell (type return for sh, the
default).  Then edit /etc/ttys as above and enable root logins.  Then
exit the shell, which will let your system boot into multiuser mode.
Root will then be able to log in.

And then make an account for yourself!  And use `su'!

-- 
Sean Kelly
NOAA Forecast Systems Laboratory, Boulder Colorado USA

My friend Winnie is a procrastinator.  He didn't get his birthmark
until he was eight years old. -- Steven Wright



Want to link to this message? Use this URL: <http://docs.FreeBSD.org/cgi/mid.cgi?9602091619.AA20987>