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Date:      Fri, 23 Jan 2015 10:20:05 -0600
From:      Bigby James <bigby.james@dimthoughts.com>
To:        freebsd-questions@freebsd.org
Cc:        Odhiambo Washington <odhiambo@gmail.com>
Subject:   Re: FreeBSD 10 and manually compile applications without gcc
Message-ID:  <20150123162005.GA5402@workbox.Home>
In-Reply-To: <20150120185053.GA57651@slackbox.erewhon.home>
References:  <CAAdA2WNpTpnQ_7KO10mEnoz7w9=TU+iSOcjo=Wi=asxk5aopww@mail.gmail.com> <54BD0AF0.5040809@infracaninophile.co.uk> <20150120185053.GA57651@slackbox.erewhon.home>

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> Running ./configure --help can be helpful. It shows what the possible options
> and environment variables are.

You can also read the Makefile for a port, or run 'make showconfig' and 'make
showconfig-recursive.' The latter will show you a list of options that can be
ticked off in the dialog box a build time; the former is a way to see any
options that (for whatever reason) might not be presented in the dialog box.

> For another app that I needed to compile outside of the ports tree...

Consider having a look  at two things: the Porter's Handbook,[1] and
ports-mgmt/portshaker.[2] The first is self-explanatory; the second is a means
of managing your own self-written ports in tandem with the official ports tree.
If you're at all familiar with Gentoo, it's basically the same concept as a
Portage overlay.

[1]: https://www.freebsd.org/doc/en_US.ISO8859-1/books/porters-handbook/
[2]: https://www.freshports.org/ports-mgmt/portshaker/

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