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Date:      Wed, 14 Dec 2016 07:17:01 -0700 (MST)
From:      Warren Block <wblock@wonkity.com>
To:        Matthew Seaman <matthew@FreeBSD.org>
Cc:        freebsd-questions@freebsd.org
Subject:   Re: 3 disk Raid 5 on FreeBSD 11
Message-ID:  <alpine.BSF.2.20.1612140710440.97382@wonkity.com>
In-Reply-To: <038663aa-a4a5-fd79-b360-37bad78f7acb@FreeBSD.org>
References:  <CY4PR20MB13970006CAC37BD235D1666B809A0@CY4PR20MB1397.namprd20.prod.outlook.com> <038663aa-a4a5-fd79-b360-37bad78f7acb@FreeBSD.org>

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On Wed, 14 Dec 2016, Matthew Seaman wrote:

> On 2016/12/14 11:39, Gerard Seibert wrote:
>> I have an HP Envy 810-170st PC running Windows 10 Pro / 64 bit with a 3
>> disk raid 5 setup. Intel Rapid Storage Technology is handing the raid
>> setup.
>>
>> Now, if I wanted to reformat the system and install FreeBSD 11, what
>> would I have to do to get the system set up with raid 5 again? Intel
>> doesn't have a driver that runs under FreeBSD for this as far as I can
>> tall.
>
> You have essentially two choices here:
>
>  * use the hardware RAID that you're currently using with Windows
>
>  * use ZFS to create a RAIDZ pool
>
> The first option depends on having the right sort of support in FreeBSD.
> You should be able to test that by downloading a USB install image and
> booting from that to use the live FreeBSD filesystem.  You should be
> able to see if your Intel RAID is recognised by looking at the boot
> messages and seeing what devices appear in /dev

If that is motherboard RAID, graid(8) probably supports it.

> If you can see the RAID device then you should be able to delete your
> current Windows install and write FreeBSD onto the system in its place.
>
> Your other choice is to ignore the on-board RAID, and just have FreeBSD
> access each drive individually and use what the OS provides to create
> your disk arrays.  If you want a RAID5 type of setup, then the realistic
> choice is to use ZFS with RAIDZ.

That would be my choice.  ZFS is kind of the opposite end of the 
spectrum from motherboard RAID.  It also doesn't go away when the array 
is moved to a different motherboard.  (In fairness, graid(8) supports 
multiple types of motherboard RAID metadata, so it might be possible to 
access data even if the new motherboard does not have the same type.)



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