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Date:      05 Oct 1999 23:29:08 -0400
From:      Kevin Street <street@iname.com>
To:        nate@mt.sri.com (Nate Williams)
Cc:        current@FreeBSD.ORG
Subject:   Re: make install trick
Message-ID:  <87yadhyxob.fsf@mired.eh.local>
In-Reply-To: Nate Williams's message of "Tue, 5 Oct 1999 17:02:12 -0600"
References:  <000101bf0f78$fbe58b40$021d85d1@youwant.to> <199910052142.PAA05137@harmony.village.org> <99Oct6.084624est.40345@border.alcanet.com.au> <199910052302.RAA21667@mt.sri.com>

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Nate Williams <nate@mt.sri.com> writes:

> > In any case, you should not be doing lots of writes to root, so the
> > lack of softupdates should not be a problem.
> 
> So, are you suggesting make /tmp it's own disk, otherwise anytime you do
> development alot of writes are done to /.
> 
> And, if you do lots of development, then you'll have the same problem on
> /tmp as you did on / unless you waste a huge disk for /tmp. :(

You could just symlink /tmp to someplace big and softupdateable.  At least
then you can share the free space with another big filesystem.  The only
problem then is that when you boot standalone you either need to be
able to mount wherever you've symlinked it into or rm the symlink and
mkdir /tmp while you're standalone (and remember to put it back before
going multi user).  

In some ways symlinking is better than having /tmp as a mount point.
If it's a real mount point you're likely to create stuff in /tmp
while standalone that can't be seen while you're multi user with a
file system mounted on top of it.  Which leads to "...my / is full and
I can't find the files that are using all the space!"

-- 
Kevin Street
street@iname.com


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